The Grateful Ball feat. The Travelin' McCourys with Drew Emmitt, Andy Thorn, Greg Garrison (Leftover Salmon) and Adam Aijala (Yonder Mountain String Band) & Special Guests

Grateful Web & Arise Present

The Grateful Ball feat. The Travelin' McCourys with Drew Emmitt, Andy Thorn, Greg Garrison (Leftover Salmon) and Adam Aijala (Yonder Mountain String Band) & Special Guests

Sat, April 15, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm (event ends at 2:00 am)

$30 Day Of Show

This event is 16 and over

The Travelin' McCourys
The Travelin' McCourys
The Travelin’ McCourys do not stand still. They are on the road—and online—entertaining audiences with live shows that include some of the best musicians and singers from all genres. It’s always different, always exciting, and always great music.

No other band today has the same credentials for playing traditional and progressive music. As the sons of bluegrass legend Del McCoury, Ronnie McCoury on mandolin and Rob McCoury on banjo continue their father’s work—a lifelong dedication to the power of bluegrass music to bring joy into people’s lives. And with fiddler Jason Carter and bassist Alan Bartram, the ensemble is loved and respected by the bluegrass faithful. But the band is now combining their sound with others to make something fresh and rejuvenating.

They recently played with the Allman Brothers at Wanee Fest and then brought the house down at Warren Haynes’ Annual Christmas Jam, an invitation only Southern Rock homecoming. Their jam with the Lee Boys was hailed by many as the highlight of the evening, and once word of the live video hit the streets, sent new fans online to watch a supercharged combination of sacred steel, R&B, and bluegrass. They’ve also performed with Warren Haynes, Phish, and have a tour scheduled with the aforementioned Lee Boys. Ronnie McCoury described it as “peanut butter and jelly.” It was just right.

They can push forward so far because their roots are so deep. The band has a confidence that only comes with having paid their dues with twenty years on the bluegrass road. Other groups and new fans hear this immediately—the tight rhythm, the soulful material, and the confidence in taking bluegrass from the safety of the shore into uncharted waters.

Ronnie says, “We like to go in and play traditional bluegrass music the way we do it with Dad, but we also like to be able to step into situations where we can really stretch out. If we need to plug in, we’ll plug in. We’re open to anything.”

It’s that attitude, backed up by talent, that marks great musicians, traditional or progressive. The Travelin’ McCourys are twenty-first century musical pilgrims and adventurers. They’re onto something new, just like Bill Monroe was in the 1940s, but now we can see and hear that adventure live or online. Go see them, or—if you hold still long enough—they’ll come to you.
Drew Emmitt
Drew Emmitt
Revered as one of the most energetic and innovative mandolin players on the jamband/newgrass scene today, Drew Emmitt’s “inestimable talents” (An Honest Tune) don’t end with just the instruments that can be picked. Holding the wheel steady on acoustic and electric slide mandolin, acoustic and electric guitar and mandola, Emmitt’s superlative storytelling and versatile vocal abilities are incomparable. Following a decade of success with Leftover Salmon, Emmitt released his first solo effort, Freedom Ride, drawing on the talent of peers John Cowan, Peter Rowan, Sam Bush, Ronnie McCoury, Vassar Clements, Stuart Duncan and Randy Scruggs. Critics and fans loved the collaboration and Emmitt relished the chance to record with some of the giants with whom he’d shared festival stages. “It's amazing,” he said, “it's like walking in a dream….Standing on stage next to Sam (Bush) is pretty indescribable.” After touring as the Emmitt-Nershi band with Billy Nershi of The String Cheese Incident for the past few years and making several reunion appearances with Leftover Salmon, Drew Emmitt's solo work is rejuvenated and once again taking the contemporary, live gig, fresh every-time approach to bluegrass music.

Following a decade of success with Leftover Salmon, Emmitt released his first solo effort, Freedom Ride, in 2002 drawing on the talent of peers John Cowan, Peter Rowan, Sam Bush, Ronnie McCoury, Vassar Clements, Stuart Duncan and Randy Scruggs. Critics and fans loved the collaboration and Emmitt relished the chance to record with some of the giants with whom he’d shared festival stages. “It's amazing,” he said, “it's like walking in a dream….Standing on stage next to Sam (Bush) is pretty indescribable.” In 2005 he followed up with Across The Bridge, an equally impressive effort showcasing Emmitt’s bluegrass chops and songwriting talents as a straight-ahead bluegrass man. After touring as the Emmitt-Nershi band with Billy Nershi of The String Cheese Incident for the past year and making several reunion appearances with Leftover Salmon, Long Road finds Emmitt rejuvenated and once again taking the contemporary, live gig, fresh every-time approach to bluegrass music.
Andy Thorn
Andy Thorn
Plays Banjo in Leftover Salmon
Greg Garrison
Greg Garrison
Greg Garrison has strong connections to the musical worlds of bluegrass, folk, jazz, and rock, and has been able to work with a wide range of musicians including John Scofield, Joe Lovano, Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush, Ron Miles, Del McCoury, Jayme Stone, Art Lande, Fred Hess, Rudy Royston, Edgar Meyer, Bryan Sutton, and Vassar Clements.
From 2005 until 2008, Garrison toured with mandolin virtuoso and composer Chris Thile, and along with Thile, was a founding member of the critically acclaimed chamber-bluegrass ensemble (and Nonesuch recording artist) Punch Brothers. Garrison is featured prominently as a performer and writer on Punch, the band's 2008 debut release, as well as Thile's solo record How to Grow a Woman from the Ground. During Garrison's tenure with Thile and Punch Brothers, he performed at Carnegie Hall, on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno, at the Grand Old Opry, and garnered two Grammy nominations.
Denver based trumpeter/composer Ron Miles features Garrison as part of his groups, and his bass playing can be heard on the "Blossom" side of Miles's 2006 Sterling Circle release Stone/Blossom.
Juno award winning banjoist Jayme Stone (www.jaymestone.com) featured Garrison on his recent critically acclaimed and Juno nominated album "Room of Wonders" along with guitarist Grant Gordy and fiddle whiz Casey Driessen.

Greg has also been a member of Colorado bluegrass/rock band Leftover Salmon since 2000, recording three albums with the band and performing at venues and festivals across the U.S. like Red Rocks, Telluride Bluegrass, High Sierra, and Bonnaroo.

Garrison continues to maintain an active performing and recording schedule with several regional and national artists in addition to his teaching duties at Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado at Denver. He received his MM in Double Bass Performance from the University of Northern Colorado, and his BM from the University of Illinois. He also holds a DMA in Jazz Studies from the University of Colorado, where he explored the common roots of all forms of American improvised music.
Adam Aijala
Adam Aijala
Adam was born in Worcester, Massachusetts and spent the majority of his childhood in the nearby town of Sterling. As a young teen, Adam loved skateboarding and listening to punk and hardcore music. He was exposed to such bands as Black Flag, the Dead Kennedys, and the Descendents. In 1986, at age 13, he began playing electric guitar and taking lessons. He learned power chords first, playing dozens of short punk tunes. In his early years of high school, he added metal bands like Metallica and Slayer to his repertoire. Shortly after, Adam's musical tastes began to shift. He began listening to Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, and even the Grateful Dead. Desiring a new sound, Adam picked up his first acoustic guitar at age 17. He started listening to Bob Dylan and in college, Old and In The Way. During his years at UMass Amherst, Adam played whenever he could as he studied Forestry. After graduation in 1995, and after a couple of major knee surgeries, he played several open mics around Worcester; strumming his originals like "Left Me In A Hole", along with Dylan covers. He worked in the forestry field until 1997, when another knee injury forced him to rethink his career choice. It was at this point that Adam decided to pursue his career in music, moving to Nederland, Colorado. It was there where he met Jeff, Ben, and Dave…and the rest is history.
Venue Information:
Cervantes' Masterpiece Ballroom
2637 Welton Street
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.cervantesmasterpiece.com/