Shredded Beats - Night 3 ft. Hopsin (Funk Volume) & Dilated Peoples (Rhymesayers) w/ Dizzy Wright, DJ Hoppa, Black Pegasus, Rolphy, A Black Day and DJ Wesley Wayne

Cervantes' Masterpiece Presents

Shredded Beats - Night 3 ft. Hopsin (Funk Volume) & Dilated Peoples (Rhymesayers) w/ Dizzy Wright, DJ Hoppa, Black Pegasus, Rolphy, A Black Day and DJ Wesley Wayne

Sat, February 1, 2014

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm (event ends at 2:00 am)

$35 Day Of Show

Tickets at the Door

This event is 16 and over

Hopsin
Hopsin
The whole thing that got me here was controversy,” admits Hopsin. In 2010, The Panorama City, California native’s back was against the wall. He was unhappily signed to Eazy-E’s former label with a debut (Gazing At The Moonlight) failing to meet his artistic and commercial expectations after years of acting on a major network and a feature film. Hardly a “kiddie rapper,” the emcee took to the Internet and released, “Sag My Pants,” an instant rewind. “I lashed out against Ruthless Records. I knew that would have some shock value. But at the time, I had to do whatever I could do.” Hopsin’s survival mechanisms have guided him through life. As a youth placed in Special Education classes, Hop overcame the obstacles to become a video editor, music producer in addition to rapper. He is also co-founder of the low profile indie-powerhouse Funk Volume, currently with 100,000 YouTube subscribers and 145,000 Facebook Likes. This 2012 XXL Freshman is at the top of his class.
In an era defined by cosigns and flashiness, Hopsin and his Funk Volume cohorts took to the rapper’s basement. Raised on the music of Eminem and 50 Cent, Hop studied how to engage fans, both with sharp lyricism and careful branding. Also having a passion for video production, Hop succeeded in going viral without big budgets. “I want people to know it’s a Hopsin video. A lot of things matter: Colors, cuts, wardrobe, and acting. Some rappers come out and look so fake instantly. You just gotta learn how to make yourself into something that there’s not a lot of things about you that people can knock.” On his self-released sophomore album, Raw, Hopsin embodied a confidence in the vein of Hip Hop legends. “I realized we had something. I made $4,000 in one day off that album. It’s still a lot to me today, but back then, I was living off just a few dollars a week.” Following, Hop was performing for hundreds nightly on the I Am Raw Tour. The mastermind recalls, “I knew things were taking off a lot bigger and faster than we expected.”
In the three years since Raw, Hopsin has steadily supplied his thousands of album-buying fans with free music, notably his “Ill Mind Of Hopsin” series. The artist is still fearless in maintaining the spirit of lunchroom battles with SwizZz years ago; “I don’t care to burn a bridge if I didn’t want to cross it anyway.” In the meantime, he appeared on Tech N9ne’s video single “Am I A Psycho?” as well as a Top 3 album by Insane Clown Posse, The Mighty Death Pop. “The key thing is I don’t hang around bullshit artists who convince me to make bullshit songs. I just hang in my basement with the same people I’ve always hanged with. I’m the same guy; I haven’t changed.”
With cover stories and a plethora of seven-figure YouTube content, the self-made talent is sticking to his formula on his third LP, Knock Madness. “It’s gonna be hard to top—I’m calling it right now,” he boasts, claiming it’s just “an enhancement” of his work. Moreover, he wants to punctuate his career. “This will probably be my last album for a long time.” Elaborating, the recluse promises “the biggest tour I’ve ever done, and I’m leavin’ for a while” as devotes his attention to Funk Volume.
While controversy may have made Hopsin a star, skill and courage made him a fan favorite. Whether making art in his basement, crowd-surfing or skiing Down Under, Hopsin has the attitude and charisma that makes Hip Hop unpredictable again.
Dilated Peoples
Dilated Peoples
Dilated Peoples is an underground hip hop group that resides in California. It has achieved great fame in the underground hip hop community, although it has had little mainstream success in the US, with the exception of the song "This Way," a 2004 collaboration with Kanye West. It reached the Top 40 of the UK Singles Chart with two tracks, "This Way" and "Worst Comes to Worst." Their members include DJ Babu (producer/DJ), Evidence (emcee-producer) and Rakaa Iriscience (emcee).

Its members, DJ Babu from the DJ crew Beat Junkies; Evidence; and Rakaa joined together in 1992 and released "Third Degree" (1997) and "Work the Angles"(1998) on ABB Records, developing a solid fan base in the underground hip hop community. They had previously recorded an album titled "Imagery, Battle Hymns & Political Poetry" that was never released (1995), although many fans still have it on bootlegged tapes. The group eventually signed with Capitol Records and released The Platform (2000) to more critical acclaim. Its second set, Expansion Team, was released in 2001 led by The Alchemist-produced "Worst Comes to Worst," which utilized a vocal sample from Mobb Deep's "Survival of the Fittest" and a musical sample from William Bell's "I Forgot to be Your Lover." The group's third album, Neighborhood Watch, was released in 2004 and debuted at #55 on USA's Billboard 200 Albums Chart. In addition to the Kanye West-produced single "This Way," it featured the single "Who's Who?" which was also included as a track on the Need for Speed: Underground and SSX 3 soundtracks, and peaked at #35 on the UK Singles Chart. Its latest album, 20/20, was released in 2006; the debut single, "Back Again", was featured on the Fight Night Round 3 soundtrack. This is the third EA Games Soundtrack on which the group has been featured. "Back Again" is also featured on Sony's MLB 06: The Show. 20/20 was the group's "farewell" album on Capitol Records, ending an increasingly frustrating four album contract, which restricted the group's solo careers.
Dizzy Wright
Dizzy Wright
“You just don’t become a leader in one year. You’re prepped for it. When you’re at your lowest—but you got that faith—that gives you motivation. And when you have that motivation, that’s what makes you a leader,” says Las Vegas native Dizzy Wright. Beyond his years at 22, Dizzy has been one of the first Sin City rappers to grab the spotlight and carry it across the globe.

“My mom kicked me out when I was 17,” Dizzy reveals of the woman who both raised him and managed his career since childhood, “I was thrown out into the world.” With a similar story to his inspiration, Tupac Shakur, he took to local clubs to build a network and fan-base by being both skilled and flashy. “I was all about getting people to know my name. I knew the vision, but I didn’t know the gesture. You’ve got to live through this to get an understanding of it.” Along the way, Wright says that life taught him to keep a tight circle and to be concerned with how his music sounded in venues just as much as the writing. That dichotomy of substance and swagger has made Dizzy Wright an independent charting sensation with three 2012 releases, SmokeOut Conversations (along with the 200,000 times downloaded promotional mixtape), as well as a follow-up EP, The First Agreement. In turn, the youngest member of Funk Volume has been one of the most active.

Although SmokeOut Conversations could be dismissed as just marijuana music, the inspiration behind the concept is deeply personal to Dizzy. The rapper asserts, “I didn’t want people to perceive me as this weed rapper with a weed album.” Instead, he admits that a key moment in creating the album came from his first encounter with his father. “I did a show in Detroit with Hopsin, and I got to meet my father for the first time. I was trying to figure out what he was gonna be like. He went to jail a couple months before I was born, and then he got out 20 years later.” To buffer the circumstances, Dizzy and his Pops eased tensions with some help. “When I finally met him, all we did was smoke and talk.” “We just got to do a lot of catchin’ up, lotta talkin’, and lotta smokin’.” After his father traveled to several dates with the Funk Volume family, Dizzy left the experience with a title and theme for his debut album.

The independent album produced two multimillion-view videos on YouTube, “Solo Dolo” and “Can’t Trust Em.” Dizzy was specific in giving his expanding base both sides of his repertoire. The first was Dizzy’s most personal record, while the second had, what he calls “that now-sound.” Both resonated, and the rapper was able to go from “doing shows to doing concerts” in his relentless touring with label-mates. Reflecting, he notes, “I was just testing the waters.” Ready to fully jump in, Wright promises of his forthcoming work, “My next album will be the biggest one to date. It’ll be the perfect material for the fans, ‘cause I understand everything a lot more.”

Like his idol, Dizzy Wright embodies a do-for-self journey that’s magnetized listeners with his natural charisma. Perhaps with a cloudy chorus or a bassline to make it digestible, he’s leading a new charge. “’Pac’s passion gives me passion. I don’t wanna be just one of these niggas just talkin’.” In life and in music, already he’s saying much more.
DJ Hoppa
DJ Hoppa
"Whether sampling other artists or composing his own beats, DJ Hoppa has an innate sense of groove that never comes across as manufactured or mechanical. He borrows sparingly and delivers tastefully -- never running classic tracks into the ground, but presenting them as gentle reminders of the better days, back in the day."

-Jamey Bresden (The Deli Magazine LA)
Black Pegasus
Black Pegasus
Robert Houston II was born on March 24, 1980 in Germany where his father was stationed with the US Air Force, and lived in Arizona, Florida and New Mexico before his family settled on the Southeast side of Colorado Springs when he was age ten. He is from the Woodside Townhomes section in Colorado Springs. He is of mixed African-American and Mexican descent, hence the title of his fourth album, The Black Mexican. He open enrolled for high school and attended Widefield and Mitchell High School, and began rapping when he was sixteen, soon performing and working in his early days under the name Yo Mamma's Pimp. He worked with the group Fusion of Syllables (F.O.S.) for two years before going solo in 2001. Black-P has released five studio albums (Black Pegasus, Knuckle Up, F**K YO RADIO, The Black Mexican, and Black By Popular Demand), two mixtapes (Black P The Mixtape, and Shitting On the Industry Vol.1), and one collaboration CD (Banana Spitz) with Liquid Assassin of the hip hop group Grave Plott. His new album Brass Knuckle King was released in 2011, and featured guest appearances by Immortal Technique, Liquid Assassin, and Kutt Calhoun. Black P is also currently working on a collaboration album entitled "The Council", which will consists of Black P, King Tef, Hypnautic, and Johnny Rocketz. Black P's seventh studio album, "Yo Mamma's Pimp", is slated for a 2012 release as well.
Venue Information:
Cervantes' Masterpiece Ballroom
2637 Welton Street
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.cervantesmasterpiece.com/