Joey Porter's Shady Business feat. Nigel Hall & Adam "Schmeeans" Smirnoff (Lettuce), Robert "Sput" Searight (Snarky Puppy) and Jennifer Hartswick, Natalie Cressman & James Casey (Trey Band) w/ Cory Henry Presents: The Revival - SATURDAY

Joey Porter's Shady Business feat. Nigel Hall & Adam "Schmeeans" Smirnoff (Lettuce), Robert "Sput" Searight (Snarky Puppy) and Jennifer Hartswick, Natalie Cressman & James Casey (Trey Band) w/ Cory Henry Presents: The Revival - SATURDAY

Sat, March 12, 2016

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$30 Day Of Show

Tickets at the Door

This event is 16 and over

JOEY PORTER'S SHADY BUSINESS WILL FEATURE:

** Nigel Hall (Lettuce)

** Adam "Schmeeans" Smirnoff (Lettuce)

** Robert "Sput" Searight (Snarky Puppy)

** Garrett Sayers (The Motet)

** Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band)

** Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band)

** James Casey (Trey Anastasio Band)

Joey Porter's Shady Business
Joey Porter's Shady Business
Multi talented keyboardist for The Motet, Joey Porter's Shady Business, and Juno! What
Nigel Hall
Nigel Hall
Soul provider Nigel Hall is in many ways an artist who needs no introduction. An in-­demandsideman, he’sbuilt a mighty foundation of funk over the years onstage and in the studio withcollaborators including the Warren Haynes Band, Jon Cleary, Soulive, Oteil Burbridge and Roosevelt Collier, Ledisi, the Soul Rebels, Lettuce and countless others. Legions of fans are already well in the know about Hall’s copious keyboard chops and powerful vocal style. But even to them, his Feel Music/Round Hill debut solo album will be arevelation –a confirmation that Hall has stepped out front and center into a creative space to call his own.“Ladies &Gentlemen... Nigel Hall,” due out in digital formatNovember 13thand vinyl November 27, captures the spirit of the songs that made Hall a musician. It was produced by EricKrasno, guitarist and producer of music by a dizzying array of artists including Norah Jones, Justin Timberlake, Talib Kweli, Aaron Neville and Matisyahu. Hall’soriginal compositions,from the blissful, sunny ‘60s-­style soul groovesoflead single“Gimme A Sign” and “Never Gonna Let You Go” to the teasing, R&B kiss of downtempo cuts like “Too Sweet” and “Call on Me” show off a record collector’s pitch-­perfect knowledge and a lifelong fan’s passion for gritty, muscular rhythm and blues, funky dancefloor rave-­ups and sultry bedroom serenades. Nigel Hall grew up in Washington, D.C., in a highly musical family. His fingers first touched the keys before he hit kindergarten age, and his ears were wide open. “I grew up with records,” he said. “That’s why I’m obsessed. My father had a vast collection. I’d be in third grade with my Walkman and everyone’s listening to Ace of Bass, and I’m listening to “Return to Forever,” Chick Corea’s fusion project with Stanley Clarke. The vintage soundsof “Ladies & Gentlemen... Nigel Hall,” infused with his electric freshness, together make both an audible autobiography and Nigel Hall’s musical mission statement. Cover choices including Ramp’s “Try, Try, Try,” written by Roy Ayers, Ann Peebles’ “I Can’t Stand The Rain,” and Latimore’s “Let’s Straighten It Out”-­deep album cuts from the back pages of golden-­age R&B-­reveal a true student of the sound. Most of the songs on “Ladies & Gentlemen... Nigel Hall” were cut in one take, straight from Hall’s spirit to tape.It’s a loving, detailed, sure-­handed scrapbook of American soul influence that tugs your heart and moves your hips.“Music is our way of traveling through time,” he said. His cover of Stanley Clarke’s “I Just Want To Love You,” for example, newly recorded as a turn-­the-­clock-­back, Motown-­infused duet with intensely soulful vocalist Alecia Chakour, was originally released the year Hall was born, in 1981.“It’s a part ofmy life, a part of my childhood, and it’s a part of what made me me, that song,” he said.
Nigel Hall is alsoa relatively newresident of one of America’s most sonically significant cities, a place that has always respected the power of history. Since relocating to New Orleansin late 2013, Nigel Hall has been embraced by its world-­renownedmusic community. In early 2014, a feature in its premier music-­focused magazine, Offbeat, enthusiastically welcomed Hall as “a perfect fit” for the vibrant city and its singular culture. The Times-­Picayune’s review of his solo debut at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival the same year crowned him with a comparison to Southern funk godfather Art Neville. “It’s the best decision I ever made for myself in my life and musically,” Hall said of the move. “I’m surrounded by the most amazing, incredible musicians in the world at all times. The big picture, the sincerity is very present here at all times. It’s a breath of fresh air. Everybody’s in the vibe. Everybody’s feeling something.”You can feel it on“Ladies & Gentlemen... Nigel Hall,” particularly on the slinky, nasty, Meters-­style funk of “Don’t Change for Me.” But Hall’s recent past is present, too;; his Lettuce co-­conspirator Eric Krasno shares writing credit on severalof the original tracks, and longtime jamband collaborators like sax man Ryan Zoidis and drummer Adam Deitch, of Lettuce and Soulive,lend their talents. So does fellow crate-­digger Ahmir “?uestlove” Thompson, who guests on a cover of the Isley Brothers’ “Lay Away” along with former Rolling Stones sideman Ivan Neville. “I like to sing songs that reflect my being and who I am as a person,” he said. “Because that really touches me. When you hear a song and it makes you cry, or it makes you happy or it evokes any kind of feeling, that is music. That is what music is supposed to do. And music is the last pure thing we have left on this earth. It’s the only pure thing. "
Adam "Shmeeans" Smirnoff
Adam "Shmeeans" Smirnoff
For more than two decades, Lettuce have brought a new vitality to classic funk,matching their smooth and soulful grooves with a hip-hop-inspired urgency and mastery of beat. Now, on their fourth studio album Crush, drummer Adam Deitch, guitarists Adam Smirnoff and Eric Krasno, bassist Erick “Jesus” Coomes, keyboardist Neal Evans, saxophonist Ryan Zoidis, and trumpet players Eric Bloom and Rashawn Ross deepen that sound by channeling the sonic freedom and infectious energy oftheir incendiary live show.

Produced by Lettuce and Co-Produced recorded/mixed by Joel Hamilton at Brooklyn’s Studio G, Crush first came to life on the road, with the band developing new material and testing it out live as they toured. “We’ve all noticed that our music goes into a lot of different directions onstage, and we wanted to capture that in a way that we never really have before,” says Coomes, who names classic psychedelia and ‘90s hip-hop among Lettuce’s key inspirations on
Crush. “It’s definitely more wide-open in terms
style, but it still stays true to the funk.”

The follow-up to 2012’s Fly, Crush finds Lettuce brilliantly infusing their psychedelic and hip-hop sensibilities into bass-heavy funk. With its spidery guitar work and hypnotic beats, “Phyllis” is a delicately sprawling epic that embodies what Deitch refers to as “a chill-hop vibe that’s kind of the flip-side of all that powerful uptempo funk that people might expect from us.” On “Get Greasy,” Lettuce give a nod to the
groove-fueled EDM subgenre known as future funk, building off its highly danceable rhythm with a blissfully loose and horn-laced arrangement. And on “He Made a Woman Out of Me,” guest vocalist Alecia Chakour lends her bluesy growl to a scorching take on Bobbie Gentry’s 1970 country-soul classic.

Whether paying homage to Led Zeppelin on the fiery and guitar-driven “Silverdome” or delivering a deeply riveting and richly textured hip-hop medley with “Oresteia,” Lettuce maneuver through Crush’s kaleidoscopic sound with sophisticated ease and powerful synergy. “More so than any of the records we’ve done before, this album is very much about the improvised grooves and improvised solos,” says Krasno. “Instead of going at it like, ‘Here’s a melody, now here’s a guitar solo, here’s another
melody, here’s a sax solo,’ everyone’s leaning on each other in a way that’s completely unspoken. It’s all of us moving as one unit and creating this new sound together.”

According to Lettuce, that sense of unity and togetherness has much to do with a camaraderie that’s only intensified over the lifespan of the band. Formed in 1992, when several band members attended a summer program at Boston’s Berklee College of Music as teenagers, Lettuce was founded on a shared love of legendary funk artists like Earth, Wind & Fire and Tower of Power. After returning to Berklee
as undergrads in 1994, Lettuce started playing in local clubs and steadily built up a following that soon extended to cities across the country and then throughout the world. Releasing their studio debut Outta Here in 2002 and its follow-up album Rage!in 2009, the band dedicated the coming years to balancing their frequent touring with involvement in a host of other musical endeavors (including Evans and Krasno’s role as founding members of acclaimed soul/jazz trio Soulive).

In recent years, Lettuce have watched their fanbase expand as they’ve hit bigger and bigger stages and earned their name as a can’t-miss festival act. And in making Crush, the band had no trouble harnessing the spirit of their explosive live show. “Some of these shows we’ve played over the past couple years have been so amazing, it’s like you go home a different person,” says Coomes. “I’m sure
remembering those moments in our minds and our hearts helped bring out something special when we were recording these new songs.”

So while Crush offers everything from all-out party jams to headphone-ready journeys into space funk, each track was born from an unabashed joy and love of live performance. “That energy we get when it’s prime time and we’re about to go onstage and we’re just excited beyond belief—that all came out on this new album,” says Deitch. “There’s a feeling that the band is rising, and it’s a really beautiful thing.”
Robert "Sput" Searight
Robert "Sput" Searight
With every new project—hell, with every show they play—Snarky Puppy hopes to do something they’ve never done before. With their new album, Family Dinner, Volume 2, the eclectic, unclassifiable jazz/funk/global collective has set their sights higher than ever.

“We had a wish list of artists we wanted to collaborate with from a wide array of styles,” says bassist/composer/producer Michael League. “We tried to come up with different demographics, nationalities, even age groups. Beyond that, we wanted to write arrangements that not only the band would really shine on, but would also truly capture the essence of each artist.”

The result is a free-wheeling, wide-ranging collection, recorded live in New Orleans, featuring an astonishing list of musicians from around the world, including Susana Baca, Charlie Hunter, Salif Keita, Laura Mvula, David Crosby, and an all-star group of Big Easy players including Ivan Neville and Terence Blanchard. Various combinations of the three-dozen members of Snarky Puppy act as the house band for an unprecedented journey through different sounds, genres, and cultures.

The album is the second installment of a series that started with 2014’s Grammy-winning Family Dinner - Volume One, and is the follow-up to Snarky Puppy’s most recent release, Sylva, a collaboration with Holland’s Metropole Orkest that garnered a 2016 Grammy nomination and entered at #1 on both Billboard’s Jazz and Heatseekers Charts. The record (which comes packaged with a companion DVD that features footage of the recording process and artist interviews) is the first release in a joint partnership between Universal Music Classics and GroundUP Records, the label owned and operated by League; a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the New Orleans music education and mentorship organization Roots of Music.

Formed in 2004 at the acclaimed music school of the University of North Texas, Snarky Puppy exists as both an original music ensemble and a production team/session band, with individual sideman credits as diverse as Kirk Franklin, Snoop Dogg, Marcus Miller, and St. Vincent. Voted “Best Jazz Group” in Downbeat’s 2015 Reader’s Poll, as well as “Best New Artist” and “Best Electric/Jazz-Rock/Contemporary Group/Artist” in Jazz Times’ 2014 Reader’s Poll, they have earned accolades everywhere from the BBC to the Los Angeles Times, and All Music recently called the group “one of modern music's bright lights.”

The Family Dinner concept grew out of the band’s weekly late-night sessions at New York’s Rockwood Music Hall, where they invited different guests for each show. Settling on eight of their favorite collaborators, they gathered in Roanoke, Virginia for the making of Volume One, which was honored with a Grammy in the Best R&B Performance category.

“I love that album, but it was kind of heavy on female R&B,” says League. “The main difference this time was that we invited guest instrumentalists and paired them with singers. We put the Swedish trio Väsen with Becca Stevens, an Appalachian singer-songwriter, and as soon as they sat down, it felt like they were had been playing together for years—and that happened with each combination of artists.”

Setting up shop in New Orleans’ Esplanade Studios, Snarky Puppy rehearsed for three days on their own, then for another two days with the guest artists, and brought in an audience for three days of recording. The studio building became one big, all-day hang-out: the tone was set when guitarist Charlie Hunter went into a storage room to try out some amps, only to find everyone piling into the closet with him, yelling encouragement.

“The most important thing for something like this is the attitude, and all the musicians were amazing,” says League. “People would be downstairs jamming and talking and sticking around to be with each other. It was all egoless, just a joy.”

Though participants came from South America, Africa, and Europe, perhaps the most surprising Dinner guest was Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer David Crosby. “Someone turned him on to the group and he was tweeting about us every day,” says League. “My family are huge CSNY fans, so I sent him a PM on Twitter and he replied within an hour. He said he was in the middle of a writing binge, so I said we should do one of the new songs. The first one he sent me was ‘Somebody Home,’ and I said, ‘That’s it!’ It’s the only ballad on the album, and it’s stark. Beautiful.”

Of course, the incomparable setting also had an impact on the music of Family Dinner, Volume 2—especially since the sessions came during the days leading up to Mardi Gras. “New Orleans is its own planet, and it was really deep to have all of the artists there,” says League. “So much music has come out of the mixture of cultures in the city, and we had a microcosm of that in the studio. It just felt like the right place to be.”

The one artist who could not join for the sessions was master Afro-pop singer Salif Keita, who fell ill and was unable to travel. League made the trip to Mali and recorded Keita’s part on “Soro (Afriki)” in his home studio—truly an unforgettable experience. Both the original plan and the adjustment are a tribute to Snarky Puppy’s soaring ambition; “We try to turn obstacles into opportunities,” says League.

With Family Dinner - Volume Two complete, Snarky Puppy is back on the road, continuing their perpetual touring schedule, and working on their next recording, which will be their first studio album in seven years (“To me, that’s weird—recording in front of people is what we do,” says League). But the exposure to so many genres and the creation of such a variety of combinations will stay with these musicians forever.

“The homework we did on these styles feeds into the general pot of knowledge and experience we pull from every night,” says League. “We talk to the artists about their music, their rhythms—that’s who we are as people. We want to learn. To us, it’s not about being rich or recognized, but about surrounding ourselves with people who can help us grow. That’s what keeps you humble and hungry.”

And numbering the volumes of the Family Dinner series is the giveaway that Snarky Puppy plans to continue doing these projects for a long time. “Different places, different artists- there are so many potential variations that you get a unique personality every time,” says League. “If you get the right blend of people in the room, it will keep working. We’ll do it as long as we can.”
Garrett Sayers
Garrett Sayers
Garrett began studying jazz on upright bass and bass
guitar starting at a young age. He gained experience
coming up in the renowned music program of Hall High
School, and the local Hartford, CT jazz scene.
In 1996, Garrett was selected to join the National
Grammy In The Schools Jazz Program, an honor awarded
to only 40 people.

From 1996 - 1999 Garrett attended the New England
Conservatory in Boston where he studied with jazz
greats: Cecil McBee, Bob Moses, and Danilo Perez and
graduated with a Jazz Performance Diploma.
In addition, Garrett was selected for the prestigious
Thelonious Monk School: Jazz at Aspen summer program
in 1997.

Shortly after arriving in Boston Garrett formed the
Miracle Orchestra with fellow music school peers. For
5 years the Miracle Orchestra toured the country
gaining a devoted national fan base, while also
maintaining a solid local following, earning them
accolades such as Boston Magazines Best of Boston
"Best Local Jazz Group". The Miracle Orchestra sold
out numerous shows at their local haunt The House of
Blues in Boston as well as the legendary Wetlands in
New York City. The Miracle Orchestra released two
studio albums: "Coalescence" and "Forks Bends &
Spoons", and a live album: "Live Vol. 1".

Garrett was a founding member of the award-winning
jazz ensemble Dead Cat Bounce led by Matthew Steckler,
who were voted Boston's Best Local Jazz Act at the
2002 Boston Music Awards, and were winner of Boston
Phoenix Best Music Poll 2001 and 2002 also in the
category of Best Local Jazz Act. Garrett performed
with Dead Cat Bounce between 1996 and 2002 and
released two albums with them: "Lucky By Association"
and "Legends of the Nar" (Chonsky).

Between '99 and '01 Garrett performed with Bob Moses'
Mozamba, along with Sam Kininger and Neil Evans
(Soulive) and (DJ) Mr. Rouke. Mozamba performed at
several festivals including an opening set at Phish's
Oswego festival.

In 2002 Garrett joined the Boulder, CO based group The
Motet and toured the country playing over 250 shows
and festivals per year. In 2006 The Motet played in
front of an estimated 10,000 people at Bonnaroo and
shortly there after Bass Player Magazine wrote a
feature profile about Garrett in October, 2006. In
2007 the Motet performed one special gig with
Christian McBride where Garrett and Christian traded
bass lines and solos throughout the night, a career
highlight. Garrett has released two albums with the
Motet: "Music for Life" and "Instrumental Dissent".

In 2006, Garrett had the great honor of subbing for
Kai Eckhardt in his band Garaj Mahal alongside Fareed
Haque, Eric Levy, and Alan Hertz.

After performing several times with keyboard wizard
Kyle Hollingsworth (String Cheese Incident), he asked
Garrett in 2007 to join a new project called Soleside
featuring Speech (Arrested Developement), DJ Logic,
and Chief Excel (Blackalicious).

Since the Fall of 2007 Garrett has been touring the
States, Europe and Japan with Koch recording artist
Dwele.

Garrett has also been featured with: Carl Thomas,
Loulou (Thievery Corporation), Marcus Eaton, Goodbye
Champion, magicgravy, Henry Butler, Russel Batiste
(The Funky Meters), Steve Perkins (Jane's Addiction),
Robert Walter, and Papa Mali.
Jennifer Hartswick
Jennifer Hartswick
Jennifer Hartswick is one of the most exciting performers in music today. She inspires audiences all over the world with her powerful voice and commanding trumpet playing. She exudes confidence and joy and brings her own refreshing spirit to the stage every time she performs.

Jennifer's live performances are renowned as spontaneous, joyful and contagious. Her natural charisma and sincerity shines through, and each performance is a celebration of musical collaboration; the camaraderie between Jennifer and her band mates is always visible. And whether she is wailing on the trumpet or singing an intimate vocal solo, her performance is all part of a single seamless instrument, one that is played not only with astounding technical proficiency, but also with sensitivity, conviction and heart.

The Jennifer Hartswick Band released their latest record, Ocean Floor last fall to rave reviews.

Hartswick has been an integral member of the Trey Anastasio Band since 2001 and you can find her performing with rock, jazz and gospel ensembles throughout the world.
Natalie Cressman
Natalie Cressman
Raised in an eclectic musical household, Natalie Cressman has only continued to diversify and expand her musical universe. Still in her early 20s, the trombonist/composer/vocalist has assimilated the full range of her sonic influences into a startlingly mature, strikingly original voice that melds the sophistication of modern jazz with captivating storytelling and intoxicating melodies reminiscent of indie rock's most distinctive songwriters.

Cressman has spent much of the last four years touring the jam band circuit with Phish's Trey Anastasio, while also performing with jazz luminaries Nicholas Payton, Wycliffe Gordon, and Peter Apfelbaum. Those varied experiences are reflected on her gorgeous second release, Turn the Sea. Anastasio calls the album "a beacon of light in an increasingly cold and mechanized era of music. Natalie is standing on the precipice of an incredible life in music, and if this album is any indication of where she's headed, then I'll be listening every step of the way."

Inspired in part by those bandleaders' boundary-blurring approaches, Turn the Sea reveals a sound that's utterly uncategorizable but instantly accessible, one that belies but is also a product of Cressman's youth. "I want to make music that my own generation can respond to," Cressman says. "I would really love for anyone to listen to my music and find something to relate to. "

The disc features a stellar eight-piece band, largely culled from Cressman's Bay Area peers: trumpeter Ivan Rosenberg, flutist and clarinetist Steven Lugerner, saxophonist James Casey, keyboardist Samora Pinderhughes, guitarist Gabe Schneider, bassist Jonathan Stein, and drummer Michael Mitchell join the bandleader, who sings and plays trombone.

Cressman was raised in San Francisco by parents who guaranteed she would be constantly surrounded by music. Her mother, Sandy Cressman, is a jazz vocalist who immersed herself deeply into the traditions of Brazilian music; her father, Jeff Cressman, is a recording engineer, trombonist, and longtime member of Santana. Natalie quite naturally began studying trombone with her father, but set out to be a dancer rather than a musician. She was an aspiring ballet dancer until her junior year of high school, when an injury set her on a different path. Once she set her sights on a career in music, her parents provided not only role models but active assistance, helping to provide her with some of her earliest opportunities. "Seeing how inspired and passionate my parents were about what they were doing lit a fire in me once I decided to go for music," Cressman recalls.

Her parents provided entrée to a number of enviable opportunities, but Cressman's own prodigious gifts continued to merit her presence in any number of high-profile settings. She soon found herself playing salsa with Uruguayan percussionist Edgardo Cambon e Orquesta Candela, Latin Jazz with Pete Escovedo's Latin Jazz Orchestra, world music with Jai Uttal and the Pagan Love Orchestra, and globally-inspired avant-garde jazz with multi-instrumentalist Peter Apfelbaum, a family friend who became a key mentor. Cressman continues to work with Apfelbaum in his ensembles, The New York Hieroglyphics and Sparkler.

Cressman switched coasts in 2009 to study at the Manhattan School of Music, and the following year was enlisted by jam band pioneer Trey Anastasio for his touring band. "I first met Natalie when she was 18, and I was instantly floored by how melodically and naturally she played and sang," Anastasio says. "Natalie is the rarest of musicians. Born into a musical family and raised in a home filled with the sounds of Brazilian music, jazz and Afro- Cuban rhythms, she is seeping with innate musicality. Musicality is in her DNA."

Following her jazz-oriented debut, Unfolding, with the more song-based Turn the Sea was at least partially a result of her tenure with Anastasio, Cressman says. "Trey always wants to include the audience, but he doesn't dumb down his music to do it. I find myself between two worlds with the music that I'm writing; it's not bread and butter jazz but it's not wholly anything else either." It would be equally difficult to pinpoint Cressman's music, and at the same time equally hard to resist its allure.

The album's title track marries her silken voice and lyrical trombone with a surging rhythm evocative of waves crashing and receding; "Fortune's Fool" is a melancholy love song propelled by a somber, Middle Eastern- inflected pulse; "New Moon" sets enigmatic lyrics to a soulful, flute and Rhodes-driven groove which segues into a soaring chorus that draws on West African rhythms. The album ends with a remix of opening track "Turn the Sea," courtesy of the band's bassist in his electronica- producer guise of JNTHN STEIN. The track hints at yet more future directions for the adventurous Cressman, while making literal the song's message of risk-taking. "It's a good bookend," she says, "coming back to where you began but in a totally different place."
James Casey
James Casey
Currently touring with the Trey Anastasio Band. When not on stage with TAB you can find him playing with Lettuce, James Casey's Eclectic Collective, and 6Figures...yup
Cory Henry
Cory Henry
Cory Henry is a multi-instrumentalist and producer with a catalog worthy of a man twice his age. His primary instrument is the organ, and he began playing at the age of two. At the age of six he competed at the Apollo Theater and made it to the finalist round. In 2010 he co-produced Jay White's Larger than Life. Later that year he released his first album Christmas With You, which featured his lively renditions of Christmas classics and prominently showcased his skill as an improvisor. Kim Burrell's Grammy nominated and Stellar Award winning Love album released in 2011 boasted several tracks that were written and produced by Henry. That year he wrote for and produced much of Krishnar Lewis' One Lover's Trilogy album and released his first, "Leave you alone".

Henry is primarily known for harmonically rich organ playing that owes a greater debt to the virtuosic unpredictability of Tatum and Peterson than it does to Jimmy Smith and other members of the Hammond organ pantheon. In his best moments he seems to capture the breadth of the Jazz and Gospel idioms and produce something altogether new through his unique blending of the two genres. Although he possesses a great deal of technique, in his solos he regularly subordinates it to a narrative arch and exhibits a maturity that surpasses his years. Unlike many virtuosos he is a great accompanist, and perhaps this is why he excels also as a producer and sideman.

At the tender age of nineteen he had the opportunity to begin traveling with the Jazz legend Kenny Garrett as his organist in a stint that lasted three years. He has done television work playing on the third season of Sunday's Best for BET and on the Jimmy Fallon Show. He has worked with Yolanda Adams, Sara Bareilles, Stanley Brown, Ray Chew And The Crew, P. Diddy, Kirk Franklin, Rob Glasper, Ron Grant, Lalah Hathway, Derrick Hodge, Israel Houghton, Joe, Shaun Kingston, Donald Lawrence, Mary Mary, Donnie McClurkin, Michael McDonald, Boyz 2 Men, NAS, Snarky Puppy, Tommy Sims, Bruce Springsteen, The Roots, Hezekiah Walker, Bishop Jeffrey White, Betty Wright, the late Timothy Wright, and many others. Henry's awe inspiring impromptu YouTube performances have gained him a loyal and sizable following. His latest release, "First Steps" was released in the Spring of 2014 and went to #1 on iTunes Jazz Chart. He is currently touring with "Snarky Puppy" and lending his considerable talent to the production of several projects for other artists.
Venue Information:
Cervantes' Other Side
2637 Welton St.,
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.cervantesmasterpiece.com/